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Old 07-28-2018, 04:49 PM   #21
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Back to the original question - can I tow it with a SWR? You need to lookl at your GRAWR, GVWR, GCVWR axle ratio, and how much you are going to carry. Figure a full tank of fuel, number of people in the vehicle, and what else you will have in the truck - dog, tools, etc. in the GVWR, and also, in spite of whst the dealer tells you, your pin weight will probably be in the 20% to 25% of loaded weight. Not a simple answer, but the calculations need to be done. I did this, and bought a dually.
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Old 07-28-2018, 05:48 PM   #22
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I've been pulling heavy 16K pounds 5ers with a 1 ton SRW for 8 years. It pulls and stops just fine. HOWEVER...it is a real struggle keeping within the trucks weight ratings. Darn near impossible as a full timer. The truck is paid for, so for now I'll keep it. But, my next truck will be a Dually, because I get about 1300 more GVRW...
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Old 07-28-2018, 07:56 PM   #23
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Towing A RW 3821RL

I've towed our 2013 36FB (MGVW 16,500) out west several times with a SRW 1 ton 2012 Ram with no problems. I had complete control with no "white knuckle" moments even in the mountains. I have a friend with a SRW Ford one ton and he had to add a helper leaf to his springs to level things off. I tow with a DRW F350 now but it is because I also have a large truck camper and the DRW adds stability.
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Old 07-28-2018, 08:05 PM   #24
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I think this has been the most hotly debated topic on our forums for the last 5 years I've been on here. If someone really wants to tow it with a SRW, then that's what they're going to do. But I will tell you we have three or four members on here (myself included) that tried it for awhile, took stock of the truck rear axle and tire weights, and traded a perfectly good 1 ton SRW that was still under warranty on a DRW. The towing difference is night and day, and now the truck rear axle and tires are not overweight. All I need to say.
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Old 07-28-2018, 08:54 PM   #25
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This is not my first 5th wheel but it is my first Redwood. Any suggestions on upgrades needed, or is the trailer pretty stout as it sits. I have read a few threads about axle, tire, suspension, and brake upgrades. I hope they are not needed due to the price and reputation of the coach.

I am just looking for suggestions or options of things for our new coach. I will be installing airbags this weekend before I pick up the coach on the 7th.

Thanks and looking forward to our new adventures!!
Really good shock on the rear of the truck helps. My stock rancho (oem GM 3500 ) rode like a pig stick with the trailer , I diched to the stock shocks at 40,000 miles went to Bilstein 5100 models they where better but not good. Then I went to Fox with remote cans these where much better then the Bilstein. The stock style shocks could not control the trailer weight when crossed on and off bridges. So maybe the problem really is the trailer not having shocks . They are so long it likes to transfer an extra 1000 or so pounds on the hitch when your 5th hits the bridge joints. My current thinking is save my money and put Morryde IS in the trailer , Morryde has independent wheel travel and a shock on each wheel control arm. Pin box wise I have a flex air box , it does a ok job of controling front to back chucking but I think the Morryde box is going to give you the best ride ( less movement in the back of the truck). For me 36 gallons of fuel isn't enough, I feel you can only use 30 gallons safely so a extra tank in the bed is a must. Pulling into fill at your local center of town gas/ deisel station isn't a option when your 13'-4" and 70' long. Truck stops are your best option. At 9-10 mpg I can last longer the the truck ! I have 2 24 gallon tanks in front of the hitch I built. Not sure if it's not legal but we will tell. I have a small 20 gallon per hour pump that put it in the main tank with a switch in the cab to turn it on. I can run about 9 -12 hour on the fuel on board now. Wind and hills play a big roll on how far you can go. Strong head winds you may only get 5mpg at 60-65 mph!
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Old 07-29-2018, 12:11 AM   #26
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I pull 13” 36rl with a 18 Chevy 3500 and haven’t had any issues! Allison in toe mode exhaust brake
No issues at all ! I had a 16 DRW that was great also
Just stiffer rear end! I also have 100 gallons of fuel in the bed ! Good luck
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Old 07-29-2018, 12:48 PM   #27
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I am contemplating a new RW 3821RL. I have a 2017 Ford F-350 (4x4) the dealer is telling me my truck will pull it no problem which I am sure it will. However, how safe is it to be pulling a 15k trailer behind a SRW F350. I just bought this truck 10 months ago and don’t feel like trading it in for a DRW. Are the Redwoods to much trailer for a SRW 350.

Thoughts and opinions appreciated!
I drive a 2012 F350 and pull a 2016 Refwood 38RL. I have pulled in the mountains of Colorado as well as a trip to Yellowstone from Texas. I've never had any concerns about my single axle.

The thing that I am contemplating is upgrading the brakes in my trailer but that is not associated with any concern regarding the single axle. My buddy drives and swears by his duel axel and perhaps there is a more stable ride, but for me it is neglible and not enough difference to purchase a new truck or have concerns about pulling my 38 RL.

Enjoy your travels!
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Old 07-29-2018, 01:32 PM   #28
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Being one who pulls our 2013 Redwood 36FB with a single screw HDT, I would typically be an advocate for recommending a small HDT with lots of weight, horsepower, and brake surface on the tow vehicle, in addition to the dual wheels that come standard on the drive axle of an HDT. in addition to a good strong jake brake, or engine braking system. But, the question is, do you or I really need to go to that extreme to pull our Redwood with?



In our case, the 36FB has an actual dry weight of 13,200 lbs and a GVWR of 16,200 lbs, as noted on the door sticker inside the cabinet. Thus giving us a payload of 3000K, which we all know is easy to accidentally exceed. Especially when fulltiming in one of these. If the 15,000 lbs weight rating on your 3821RL is the "Dry weight" rating and you add a payload of 3K, then I assume that your GVWR would be 18,000 lbs when loaded down with personal belongings, etc. Which for me would push me even more in the direction of a HDT, or at the very least a 350/3500 series with dual wheels on the drive axle. I know that although Redwood is building their line of 5ers to be more in the same class as your Tetons, Newmar 5ers, Peterson Industries, DRVs, (prior to the Thor acquisition) they are trying (especially since the Thor acquisition of Redwood) trying to build them light enough so that you can pull them with a 350/3500 Dually pickup verses an HDT. Part of that is achieved by building them on the lighter weight Lippert frames, which is my only dissapointment with my Redwood. But it is what it is, because its getting harder everyday to find a new 5er that isn't sitting on top of a Lippert.


Getting back to your question: So in the interim until you retire in a few more years, you do not plan on traveling a lot, and I assume, not be fulltime in your Redwood, Which usually means not packing as much into it in the way of personal belongings, would it be safe to pull your 3821RL with your current SRW drive pickup? On flat grades, almost anything would be able to pull it. Then comes the hill and mountains. That's when the extra weigh and horsepower of the 350 really begins to become important. Then you add rain, and in your case, you only have a footprint of 4-tires contacting that pavement and trying to control 15-18K behind them. Long as nothing goes wrong, chances are good your trip will be uneventful. But what about the unexpected panic stops or slowdowns? That's where the extra two tires really help with the stability and hopefully ability to maintain control of the 5er that know wants to run over you. But most importantly, what about an unexpected blowout on the tow vehicle, especially on a drive axle that you've added 3000 lbs plus to, (our 36FB's pin weight is 2900 lbs) even while traveling at 55 mph much less 65 mph? Note: We do not pull our Redwood over 65 mph, even with our HDT. Way too many roll over or loss of control accident pulling a fifthwheel RV with a single rear wheel equipped drive axle have occurred, resulting in the destruction of property (RV and tow vehicle) and injury and/or death to the occupants when it wasn't necessary.My wife and I have seem this way to often in both her career as an LEO, and our 15-years of operating our own specialized trucking company and traveling more than 2 million accident free miles throughout the US and Canada.


The ones who have towed their heavier 5ers with a SRW 350/3500s without incident are the lucky ones. The ones who have experience a drive axle tire blowout at 55-65 mph when pulling their 5er and maintained control of the rig are even the luckier ones, and I'm happy for all of them that nobody was hurt, and no property was damaged or destroyed. But imop, and based upon our own experience in dealing with high speed blowouts (commercially) in every tire position (drive, steer, trailer) whether on a short trip or long, you only get one chance when that tire blows of maintaining control of the rig. I was always thankful to have that second wheel on the ground next to the one that had just blown. Because I know first hand how much it aided in my ability to maintain control of the rig until I could safely slow it down and get parked on the shoulder of the road, or limp into a safe haven or tire shop on the remaining tire to get repaired. Rather than waiting hours on the side of the highway for a service truck to come, or having to change the tire myself. Just some more food for thought!
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Old 07-29-2018, 03:59 PM   #29
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My apologies for all of the errors in my previous response to this thread. I had just woke up and not finished the first cup of coffee for the day. LOL Then I forgot to proof read it before posting the response. I also failed to add that years ago when faced with whether or not my 1966 Chevy pickup was safe enough to pull the gooseneck horse trailer w/living quarters in the front that I had upgraded to, JC Whitney had conversion kits to change out the single wheel setup on the drive axle to a dual wheel configuration. The kit included new drums with the extended lugs, spacer to go between the rims, the rims themselves, and fiberglass fenders to mount onto the bed to accommodate the wider dual wheels. It was a very easy and inexpensive conversion to do. I also added airbags to the rear drive axle, along with a spring stiffener to each spring which worked perfectly. I was amazed at the difference in stability afterwards when pulling that horse trailer down the highway! So, unless its that you just don't want to drive a dually except for when towing a trailer before you retire, and instead its simply that you don't want to get rid of the current truck so soon after having purchased it, I would consider a conversion to to this truck, to make pulling your Redwood safer.
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Old 07-29-2018, 07:25 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Gary Hage View Post
My apologies for all of the errors in my previous response to this thread. I had just woke up and not finished the first cup of coffee for the day. LOL Then I forgot to proof read it before posting the response. I also failed to add that years ago when faced with whether or not my 1966 Chevy pickup was safe enough to pull the gooseneck horse trailer w/living quarters in the front that I had upgraded to, JC Whitney had conversion kits to change out the single wheel setup on the drive axle to a dual wheel configuration. The kit included new drums with the extended lugs, spacer to go between the rims, the rims themselves, and fiberglass fenders to mount onto the bed to accommodate the wider dual wheels. It was a very easy and inexpensive conversion to do. I also added airbags to the rear drive axle, along with a spring stiffener to each spring which worked perfectly. I was amazed at the difference in stability afterwards when pulling that horse trailer down the highway! So, unless its that you just don't want to drive a dually except for when towing a trailer before you retire, and instead its simply that you don't want to get rid of the current truck so soon after having purchased it, I would consider a conversion to to this truck, to make pulling your Redwood safer.
Like others on here I had a perfectly good 1 ton srw GM that I figured would handle our new redwood. Once loaded for full time my pin weight was 4200 lbs 17400lb trailer. I was over gvwr árear axle and tires. The truck pulled and stopped it fine. Having hauled heavy equipment with 44 years of having a class A CDL I new better than run this rig with the SWR. Someone got a wonderful truck when I purchased the DRW
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