Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-05-2015, 04:56 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 3
Tow redwood with class C license

I am seriously considering buying a new tow vehicle and a redwood fifth wheel. This would be my first rv purchase. I am new to this potential life style. thanks in advance.
The tow vehicle's GVWR is 14000 lbs and the redwood GVWR is 16,500 lbs; can I legally tow a fifth wheel with a Class C Texas driving license? It seems that I would need a class A drivers license. However, the rules are confusing.
Godog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2015, 05:04 AM   #2
Site Team
 
Dave&Ginny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 5,379
In the U.S. they passed laws many years ago making the commercial licenses the same in each state. The CDL class A is for commercial use ( used to be class D). Since you wont be commercial, a regular drivers license should work regardless of weight.
__________________
SOB "The RV Wiseguy"
Dave&Ginny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2015, 03:26 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
mhs4771's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 2,290
Carefull Dave, many states if the Combined Gross is over 26K they require some sort of addition to a regular license. And because of RWs being heavy there are many of us that are over the 26K number. NY requires an "R" endorsement, Florida doesn't required anything, some other require a non-commercial CDL and everything inbetween. You really need to check with the State where you'll be licensed.
__________________
Michelle & Ann
2018 Chevy 3500HD Crew Cab High Country DRW, D/A, 2016 RW39MB, Dual ACs, Auto Level, Auto Sat Dish, Stack W/D, King Sleep #, 17.5" GY114s w/Disc, MORryde IS & Pin, Comfort Ride Hitch, 5.5 Onan, Res Fridge & Induction Cook Top
mhs4771 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2015, 03:54 PM   #4
Site Team
 
Dave&Ginny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 5,379
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhs4771 View Post
Carefull Dave, many states if the Combined Gross is over 26K they require some sort of addition to a regular license. And because of RWs being heavy there are many of us that are over the 26K number. NY requires an "R" endorsement, Florida doesn't required anything, some other require a non-commercial CDL and everything inbetween. You really need to check with the State where you'll be licensed.

That's a good point, but a class "A" isn't necessary. The class "A" endorsement is for all single and combination vehicles with the exception of "stinger steer".

You're right, some of the states my require a special endorsement due to the weight but I seriously doubt they'll require a 80,000 lb classification.

Personally I'm kind of torn. I don't want the government getting anymore involved in our lives, however some people can't handle these rigs very well and need taught.
__________________
SOB "The RV Wiseguy"
Dave&Ginny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2015, 04:40 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 545
Dave,
California is one. They require a non-commercial class a if the GVWR is over 15,000. (This is the weight rating of the trailer only, not its actual weight.) For trailers 10,000-15,000 they require an endorsement called a restriction 41.


Bottom line for those of us in California, most of us need a non-commercial class a. BTW, this is for 5th wheels....no restrictions for motorhomes!


Ken
brenkco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2015, 05:19 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
BradPAjax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 455
Always best to do your research on the state website you plan to licence the vehicles in. I went so far as to go to the govt weigh scale and talk to the guys that would be pulling me over and writing a ticket or impounding my truck and trailer to be sure I had what was required. Canada is getting cranky about this now with these big rigs and weekend warriors (for the most part) hauling them down the highways.
__________________
2016 F-350 Crew Cab 4x4 Dually Diesel, 2013 38BR Office config with all options and upgrades but Ceiling Fan and Ice Maker.
BradPAjax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2015, 07:45 PM   #7
lwg
Senior Member
 
lwg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 918
Am I mistaken to believe as long as your legal in your home state your good in any state? This is just in regards to the weight rating req's, not towing length and state specific towing laws.
__________________
2014 Redwood 38BR, Fulltiming
2013 Ford F-350 CCSB 6.7L 4x4 SRW, B&W Companion Hitch, Air Bags
lwg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2015, 07:52 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 545
Lwg,
Yes, you're correct. Brad's point is spot on. I am in the insurance business and insurance laws vary from state to state but all policies stipulate that they will conform to local regulations.


Can you imagine the nightmare we'd have crossing state lines and having to conform to local towing/weight regs? It would be a giant mess!


Ken
brenkco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2015, 01:39 AM   #9
Site Team
 
Dave&Ginny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 5,379
Quote:
Originally Posted by brenkco View Post
Lwg,
Yes, you're correct. Brad's point is spot on. I am in the insurance business and insurance laws vary from state to state but all policies stipulate that they will conform to local regulations.


Can you imagine the nightmare we'd have crossing state lines and having to conform to local towing/weight regs? It would be a giant mess!


Ken

Ken, that's how truck driving was in the old days. Each state would issue laws and it wasn't uncommon to have 5 or 6 drivers licenses. There's still an issue with length even with the governed CDL because some states wouldn't allow the 53 ft trailers. It used to be that when you left California, you had to show proof you bought fuel in the state or you were fined due to not paying fuel taxes . And if you had a chrome bug guard on the front of the truck, either you removed it or panted it black with spray paint.

Such sweet memories
__________________
SOB "The RV Wiseguy"
Dave&Ginny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2015, 02:18 AM   #10
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 3
Thanks

I would like to thank everybody for their input. It appears that in order to tow a redwood (16,500 GVWR) legally with a 1 ton truck, I have to get a class A non-commercial license. Under the CDL section of the code RV's are exempt but the state of Texas code states that a class C license holder cannot pull a trailer that is over 10,000 lbs., unless the combined weight of both the trailer and tow vehicle is under 26001 lbs. An individual that drives a MH will need a class B non-comercial license if his rig's GVWR is 26,001 lbs or greater.
I bet most people pulling or driving these large RV's are not in compliance with the Texas transportation stature. Tomorrow I am going to the Houston RV show and hope to get some more information on this issue.
Godog is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Redwood RV or any of its affiliates. This is an independent, unofficial site.


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.